Category Archives: Innovative visualizations

Neptis Geoweb 4

The Neptis Geoweb: A behind-the-scenes look into the underpinning framework

Guest post by Vishan Guyadeen, Neptis Foundation. Neptis is one of the collaborating partners of the Canadian Historical GIS project. 

The age of data is upon us. Data from different fields, quality, and types have become more and more available. However, in many cases it can be hard to glean valuable information from data because one might not be able to easily visualize and/or compare it with other datasets.

In studying the forces that make up and shape urban regions, it is particularly difficult to contextualize data since it exists in many different places.  The Neptis Geoweb is an interactive mapping and data visualization platform that aims to address this issue. Specific to the Toronto region, the Geoweb utilizes data that is normally siloed in various government organizations to make the complex policies shaping the region more accessible and easier to understand.

One subject that requires data that is often difficult to obtain, understand and visualize is the history of the Greater Golden Horseshoe. The Neptis Geoweb has a unique feature – the Timeline, which guides the user through milestone policies/events that have helped to shape the region into its current state. The Timeline is an interactive feature that describes and visualizes milestones in the regional context. Users may also compare these historical map layers with other current and historical datasets for further context.

Neptis Geoweb showing historical information about Region of Niagara, keyed to timeline below map
Neptis Geoweb showing historical information about Region of Niagara, keyed to timeline below map

Creating a platform that is capable of showcasing and managing large quantities of data is not an easy undertaking. The Neptis Geoweb was built with a fully customized framework, which allowed for easy access, clear and up-to-date data, as well as the ability to maintain different types of content (e.g. maps, charts, and text). There are two main underlying components that make this possible.

First, the most important component of the Neptis Geoweb is Carto (formerly CartoDB). Carto is a cloud-based GIS platform that houses and queries all of the data layers on the Geoweb. Carto was utilized because it is a powerful and flexible platform that is easy to use. For example, Carto provides the ability to quickly manipulate data in the cloud using SQL and also visualize spatial data using either a user-friendly wizard interface or an advanced CartoCSS editor (see screenshot below). Further, Carto provides the Geoweb with the flexibility of using various data types and the ability to seamlessly interact with other platforms such as Leaflet, MapBox, and OpenStreetMaps. These additional platforms enhance the overall functionality of the Geoweb. Carto offers these and many other benefits to the Geoweb while maintaining an overall ease of use that doesn’t always require a GIS professional.

Carto graphic interface for editing layer graphics using CartoCSS (one of several methods)
Carto graphic interface for editing layer graphics using CartoCSS (one of several methods)

Second, the administrative interface of the Neptis Geoweb was custom-built by Carto developers, to organize and maintain map layers and other non-spatial content. Neptis staff are able to prepare, organize and maintain content such as map layers, municipal data profiles, and short topic stories. When dealing with large quantities of raw data and map layers, it is essential to have a way of managing content. The admin interface contains simple forms that make up the content shown on the Neptis Geoweb. The screenshot below shows part of the form that is required when creating and updating map layers.

Neptis Geoweb custom administrative interface - form for New Layer
Neptis Geoweb custom administrative interface – form for New Layer

This is a brief introduction to the Neptis Geoweb and the two main components that make it an efficient platform. Like Carto and web mapping as a whole, the Neptis Geoweb is an evolving project. As more data becomes available – whether relating to local areas, the region or beyond, the intent is to continue to enrich the Geoweb.

North Saskatchewan River flowing through Edmonton, Alberta

Whose ‘Ribbon of Green’? HGIS and the Histories of Edmonton’s River Valley and Ravines System

By Mo Engel, Shannon Stunden Bower, Andrew Tappenden, and William Van Arragon

Cross posted from niche-canada.org

Our colleagues and friends at NICHE (Network in Canadian History & Environment) and The Otter/La Loutre have just published an interesting article on an Historical GIS project based at the University of Alberta. They have generously offered it for cross-posting here. The project’s partners share many of the same goals as our Geohistory/Géohistoire efforts, and we hope to work with them closely in the future.

Part of the article reads as follows:
“The primary goal of our project is to build understanding of the complex and conflictual histories of Edmonton’s river valley. We are working toward that goal in several ways. One major effort is directed toward the production of a digital atlas highlighting the lesser-known histories of Edmonton’s river valley. Conceived as a work of public history and animated in part through the use of Geographic Information Systems [GIS], the atlas is aimed at a general audience. Over the past few years, project participants have been working to develop a purpose-built platform to display compelling historical evidence (photos, documents, film, maps, etc) within spatially-oriented narratives. The effort has involved computer scientists and digital humanists collaborating with historians to produce software intended to provide a more satisfactory means of framing arguments about the significance of particular spatial and historical processes. Once sufficiently functional, the software will be released in an open source format. In this way, it will position non-experts to deploy advanced GIS tools in the service of community-based research and dissemination.”

Demonstrating one of the capacities of our digital atlas, this clip integrates an 1882 Map of Edmonton as a tile layer with varying opacity over the current (2017) OpenStreetMap data. The annotated regions highlight 1882 state-sanctioned land ownership and are displayed in juxtaposition to the current land usage. All materials are in the public domain.
Demonstrating one of the capacities of our digital atlas, this clip integrates an 1882 Map of Edmonton as a tile layer with varying opacity over the current (2017) OpenStreetMap data. The annotated regions highlight 1882 state-sanctioned land ownership and are displayed in juxtaposition to the current land usage. All materials are in the public domain.

You can read the entire article at this link.